Take a vacation from your desk

Is your next vacation planned and on the calendar? If so, great job! You’re making a positive change for your physical and emotional health. If you think planning a vacation is too much work or too expensive, consider some of these benefits that can seriously impact your health.

It might feel too hard to get away from the office, but overworking isn’t doing your body any favors. After studying the work habits of more than 600,000 individuals across Europe, the United States and Australia, one study found that people who work more than 55 hours per week are more likely to suffer a stroke and have a greater risk of a heart attack compared to people who work 40 hours a week or less.

Just planning some time away from the office can make you a happier person and might even make you feel more supported at work. According to the U.S. Travel Association’s Project: Time Off, those who set aside time to plan out their vacation days often tend to take longer vacations. They also reported they are “very” or “extremely” happy with their relationships, health and well-being, company and job.

Taking a vacation doesn’t mean you have to take a trip either. Simply spending time away from the office on a “staycation” means you can take time to refocus and get away from the stress of everyday office life. To truly give yourself a vacation, consider turning off your work email notifications and don’t use the day to run errands or catch up on chores. To add some mental and physical activity to your staycation, the American Heart Association suggests activities like finding a new trail at your local or state park or visiting a museum, which will allow your brain to focus on something other than work.

Turn your daydreams into a reality and start planning your next vacation. Your body will thank you for it!

And don’t forget, if your plans include an international destination, give yourself complete peace of mind with a travel health insurance plan from GeoBlue®! Learn more on our website.

Sources: The Lancet, Project: Time Off, The American Heart Association

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